As building plans change, construction disputes can arise

When it comes to new construction, the changing of plans is all but inevitable. Delays, unavailable materials, workforce complications, weather and many other issues can arise over the course of a project. This can be particularly true when it comes to bigger buildings and properties.

Being prepared for these complications and changes can be crucial for all parties involved. One way to be prepared is to have a plan in place for resolving any construction dispute that does arise. For example, concerns have come up regarding the cost of a new NFL stadium and who will have to pay for it.

Reports indicate that design changes in the project resulted in an added cost of $15 million. Both the contractor and the committee tasked with the stadium's design and operation are trying to avoid taking on the higher financial responsibility and they have been trying to resolve the issue through mediation.

So far, however, the process is moving quite slowly. Mediation talks are expected to last at least another month. If the two sides cannot come to an agreement, they will need to go through binding arbitration to seek a resolution.

The dispute resolution process has evidently taken a considerable toll on more people than just those at the negotiation table. Subcontractors on the project have urged the two parties to find a settlement, as they were not getting paid for a period of time. The contracting company ended up paying the subcontractors itself as a way to assuage the situation, even though a settlement has yet to be reached.

This case may serve as a good example of why it can be so crucial to have a dispute resolution plan in place and take the steps necessary to find a fair resolution as quickly as possible. Parties who work with an attorney in similar situations across Orlando may find it easier to avoid costly delays and navigate the legal system when they have the appropriate support.

Source: Star Tribune, "Vikings stadium mediation underway, but no quick resolution in sight," Rochelle Olson, Nov. 13, 2015